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Crochet Sock Pattern

8 Aug

Crochet Sock Pattern

 Socks are a quick useful project, especially in winter time. I use up my scrap yarns for these socks. They are very comfortable and wash and wear very nicely.

 This is how I make ladies’ size socks. Play around with increasing and decreasing to adjust the size. Here is how I do mine:

 Supplies:

Size I Crochet hook

About 1 skein of worsted weight yarn

Pattern Notes:

I used the “dc 2 together” as a decreasing stitch on round 16. Here is how to use it (it uses the next 2 sts):

To dc2tog – *YO, insert hook in next st, YO, pull up a loop, YO, draw through two loops*, repeat from * to * once, YO, and draw through all 3 loops on hook.

Foot:

Rnd 1: Starting at toe, ch 3, 11 dc in third ch from hook, join with sl st in top of ch-3. (12 dc made)

 Rnd 2: Ch 2, 2 dc in next st, (dc in next st, 2 dc in next st) around, join. (18 dc)

 Rnd 3: Ch 2, dc in next st, 2 dc in next st, (dc in each of next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st) around, join. (24 dc)

 Rnd 4-5: Ch 2, dc in each st around, join.

 Rnd 6: Ch 2, dc in each of next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st, (dc in each of next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st) around, join. (30 dc)

 Rnd 7-11: Ch 2, dc in each st around, join. Fasten off.

 Heel:

Row 8: Working in rows, for heel, skip first 22 sts, join with sc in next st, hdc in each of next 2 sts, dc in next 12 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sc in each of next 2 sts leaving remaining sts unworked, turn. (19 sts)

 Row 9: Ch 1, sc in each of first 2 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, dc in next 12 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sc in last st, sc in next unworked st on rnd 7, turn. (20 sts)

 Row 10: Ch 1, sc in each of first 2 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, dc in next 12 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sc in each of last 2 sts, sc in next unworked st on rnd 7, turn. (21 sts)

 Row 11: Ch 1, sc in each of first 3 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, dc in next 12 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sc in each of last 2 sts, sc in next unworked st on rnd 7, turn. (22 sts)

 Row 12: Ch 1, sc in each of first 3 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, dc in next 12 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sc in each of last 3 sts, sc in next unworked st on rnd 7, turn. (23 sts)

 Row 13: Ch 1, sc in each of first 4 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, dc in next 12 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sc in each of last 3 sts, sc in next unworked st on rnd 7, turn. (24 sts)

 Rnd 14: Working in rounds, ch 1, sc in each of first 4 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, dc in next 12 sts, hdc in each of next 2 sts, sc in each of last 4 sts, sc in remaining 6 sts on rnd 7, join with sl st in first sc, turn. (30 sts)

 Leg:

Rnd 15: Ch 2, dc in each st around, join. (30 dc)

 Rnd 16: Ch 2, dc in each of next 2 sts, dc2tog, (dc in each of next 3 sts, dc2tog) around. (24 dc)

 Rnd 17-22: Ch 2, dc in each st around, join. (24 dc)

 Rnd 23: Ch 1, sc in same st, ch2, (sc in next st, ch 2) around, join. Fasten off.

 Make 2

 Caring for your socks. I just throw them in the washer with other like colors. I usually line-dry mine. The tops get a little stretched out when I wear them, but they come out of the wash back to normal size!

©Mary Sue Hershberger 2011

I am making this pattern available to you to be used for personal and charity use only. Please don’t sell the pattern. It is okay to sell the finished product at craft shows (not online), ect. If you have any questions about the pattern or about permission to use it please ask me! Thank-you!

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DIY Notebooks / Scribble Pads made from scrap paper

1 Aug

DIY Notebooks / Scribble Pads made from scrap paper

I guess for every fun or beneficial activity there is usually a down side. One such thing is printing coupons. At times I use coupons printed off the internet and one thing that always frustrated me is all the ‘scrap paper’ made from printing them. Especially annoying is the programs that print one coupon in the middle of the page! So here is an idea what to do with the scrap paper from printing coupons. Any other scrap paper will work too!

 You will need:

Lots of scrap paper

Paper cutter or scissors

Printed paper for cover -optional

Stapler

Elbow grease to run the stapler!  🙂

The first step, of course, is to cut out your coupons. I know that is a basic step, but if you would like pointers on how to save the most paper, I will put tips on cutting out coupons in another post.Once you have the scrap paper, sort it. Put blank pieces together, Pieces with a little printing on the edges together, and pieces with lots of printing together. For this project I used the pieces that were blank or had very little printing on them. The stuff with a lot of printing on one side (you know those huge ads that print with some coupons!) went for scrap paper in the family business.

Then take the blank pieces and sort them by size. The pieces do not have to exactly match in size. I did not trim mine to be exact, but you could do that if you want to.Once you have the pieces sorted by size, count out 10 pieces. You can add or subtract to this number, but this is how I did mine. Fold each piece in half:Each piece should be 8.5” wide on one side. Fold them so that the long side is at the bottom. This will make your booklet about 4.25” wide.  Put the pieces together to look like a booklet:If the pages weren’t exactly the same height, I put the shorter ones inside. Now you should have a booklet of 20 pages!

At this point you are ready for the cover. Or if you choose not to use a separate cover, skip down to the stapling part.

The cover:I printed off black and white (to save ink!) photos from my computer. Make sure you right-align them in your document so they end up right side up and on the front of your booklet! Another idea is to use plain paper and use stickers or have a child draw a picture to decorate it.

 Cut them down to the size you need it to cover the booklet you have. I just eye-balled them for size.Fold the cover in half just like you did the pages. Then it is ready to put on your booklet!

Stapling

This was the hard part for me. Well, actually not because I got someone else to do it for me! I am not strong enough to punch a stapler that hard so I got a stronger person to help me with this step. You will need a strong punch to get the staple through all 22 layers of paper. Place your folded cover over the booklet and staple it along the back. I put in two staples.

The finished product:Repeat these steps as often as you like to make as many notebooks as you like!!

Here are some variations:

The following picture shows what the books will look like with a bit of printing on the edge of the page. If you’re planning to use the notebook for a scribble pad, it won’t matter to have a bit of printing in it. But if you prefer it to be blank, you can always trim those lines off.These pictures also show that we tried to trim the outside edge to be even. Paper cutters –at least mine-  don’t do that great a job trimming really thick edges.

These notebooks can be made in any size. I also made a big one:For the cover on this notebook, I used a paper just slightly larger than the 10 pages, and folded the one side over the edge. Like this:

I used three staples instead of two.

Using cardstock for the cover will make a much sturdier cover, but as you can see that is even harder to get the staples through!

 

Use your imagination! Have fun!

I created this tutorial for you to use for home and personal use. Thank-You! Ask any questions. Let me know if you like it.

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